Sign up to get the latest updates

Home

Coal production poses serious risks to the health of local communities, as well as causing substantial environmental damage – both of which incur substantial economic costs. The impacts on local communities in the Hunter Valley include exposure to harmful air, noise and water pollution, distress associated with social disruption, and a sense of abandonment as government's prioritise the interests of the coal industry above that of the community. 

Coal and health in the Hunter: lessons from one valley for the world is a new report produced on behalf of the Climate and Health Alliance to be released on Monday 23 February 2015. It provides a comprehensive analysis of what the rapid expansion of coal mining in the Hunter Valley means for the health of the local population as well as the risk to the global community from the contribution to climate change from coal exports. 

Read the report in full here. You can also read the report's recommendationssummary for policymakers, and a series of case studies including short videos to watch and share.

 


 

CALL TO ACTION: CLICK HERE TO ADD YOUR VOICE TO THOSE CALLING FOR REAL REFORM TO PROTECT THE COMMUNITY'S HEALTH FROM COAL IMPACTS


 

  • Latest from the blog

    The Battle for Bulga

    John Krey’s home near the tiny town of Bulga is just a few kilometers away from three of the largest open cut coal mines in the Hunter Valley: Mount Thorley Warkworth (owned by Rio Tinto), the Bulga mine (Glencore-Xtrata), and Wambo (Peabody Energy).
    Continue reading

    Wendy's Camberwell

    Wendy Bowman has been a farmer in the Hunter Valley region since 1957. She was forced off her previous farm, Ashton, by the Ravensworth South open cut coal mine by constant dust and water pollution from the mine. Her Droughtmaster cattle farm, Rosedale, is now in the sights of Yancoal.
    Continue reading